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RED ZONE MARKETING 
A Playbook For Winning All The Business You Want
by Todd Gitlin

Facts on Demand Press ISBN 1-889150-34-7
 

Through her new book, Red Zone Marketing, Maribeth Kuzmeski offers some innovative ways to readers to sell their services to that exclusive group of prospects that make up their niche.

According to Kuzmeski, even the most struggling business is better off finding and focusing on its natural niche—and doing everything it can to own that little segment of the market.

Kuzmeski is a big believer in the power of the niche. In fact, in Red Zone Marketing she makes specific niche positioning the first component in her five-pronged SCORE formula for winning new clients.

"Never, never, never try to be all things to all people," she asserts. "Try to please everyone and you'll please no one. We've all heard this principle, but few companies truly act on it. When they do, however, the results are amazing.

As Kuzmeski writes in her book, "The word 'niche' is defined as 'a situation or activity suited to a person's ability' . . . Interestingly enough, the word itself is derived from the French se nicher, which is translated as 'to build a nest.' Finding your niche in the business world is exactly that: building your nest."

So finding your niche—be it a geographical area, a particular industry or a subset of a certain category of clients (divorced men with kids? physically challenged business travelers? professional women with no time to cook?)—should be a relatively simple process. Where you may be falling short is in marketing to that niche.

In her book, she recommends that a business owner call him or herself a specialist. And then use the specialist concept to offer to speak to local groups and even those in other cities while on business trips.

Kumeski also recommends that business owners offer their services for free as a promotion.

Buy this book...

 

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